Antisemitism is now in the Philippines

Antisemitism is now in the Philippines

Antisemitism (also spelled anti-semitism or anti-Semitism) is prejudice, hatred of, or discrimination against Jews for reasons connected to their Jewish heritage. A person who holds such positions is called an “antisemite”.

While the term’s etymology might suggest that antisemitism is directed against all Semitic peoples, the term was coined in the late 19th century in Germany as a more scientific-sounding term for Judenhass (“Jew-hatred”),[1] and that has been its normal use since then.[2] For the purposes of a 2005 U.S. governmental report, antisemitism was considered “hatred toward Jews—individually and as a group—that can be attributed to the Jewish religion and/or ethnicity.”[3]

Antisemitism may be manifested in many ways, ranging from expressions of hatred of or discrimination against individual Jews to organized violent attacks by mobs, state police, or even military attacks on entire Jewish communities. Although the term did not come into common usage until the 19th century, it is now also applied to historic anti-Jewish incidences. Notable instances of persecution include the pogroms which preceded the First Crusade in 1096, the expulsion from England in 1290, the massacres of Spanish Jews in 1391, the persecutions of the Spanish Inquisition, the expulsion from Spain in 1492, Cossack massacres in Ukraine, various pogroms in Russia, the Dreyfus affair, the Holocaust, official Soviet anti-Jewish policies and the Jewish exodus from Arab and Muslim countries.

United States

In November 2005, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights examined antisemitism on college campuses. It reported that “incidents of threatened bodily injury, physical intimidation or property damage are now rare”, but antisemitism still occurs on many campuses and is a “serious problem.” The Commission recommended that the U.S. Department of Education‘s Office for Civil Rights protect college students from antisemitism through vigorous enforcement of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and further recommended that Congress clarify that Title VI applies to discrimination against Jewish students.[137]

On 19 September 2006, Yale University founded the Yale Initiative for the Interdisciplinary Study of Anti-Semitism (YIISA), the first North American university-based center for study of the subject, as part of its Institution for Social and Policy Studies. Director Charles Small of the Center cited the increase in antisemitism worldwide in recent years as generating a “need to understand the current manifestation of this disease”.[138] In June 2011, Yale voted to close this initiative. After carrying out a routine review, the faculty review committee said that the initiative had not met its research and teaching standards. Donald Green, who heads Yale’s Institution for Social and Policy Studies, the body under whose aegis the antisemitism initiative was run, said that it had not had many papers published in the relevant leading journals or attracted many students. As with other programs that had been in a similar situation, the initiative had therefore been cancelled.[139][140] This decision has been criticized by figures such as former U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Staff Director Kenneth L. Marcus, who is now the director of the Initiative to Combat Anti-Semitism and Anti-Israelism in America’s Educational Systems at the Institute for Jewish and Community Research, and Deborah Lipstadt, who described the decision as “weird” and “strange.”[141] Antony Lerman has supported Yale’s decision, describing the YIISA as a politicized initiative that was devoted to the promotion of Israel rather than to serious research on antisemitism.[142]

A 2007 survey by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) concluded that 15% of Americans hold antisemitic views, which was in-line with the average of the previous ten years, but a decline from the 29% of the early sixties. The survey concluded that education was a strong predictor, “with most educated Americans being remarkably free of prejudicial views.” The belief that Jews have too much power was considered a common antisemitic view by the ADL. Other views indicating antisemitism, according to the survey, include the view that Jews are more loyal to Israel than America, and that they are responsible for the death of Jesus of Nazareth. The survey found that antisemitic Americans are likely to be intolerant generally, e.g. regarding immigration and free-speech. The 2007 survey also found that 29% of foreign-born Hispanics and 32% of African-Americans hold strong antisemitic beliefs, three times more than the 10% for whites.[143]

A 2009 study published in Boston Review found that nearly 25% of non-Jewish Americans blamed Jews for the financial crisis of 2008–2009, with a higher percentage among Democrats than Republicans.[144]

In August 2012, the California state assembly approved a non-binding resolution that “encourages university leaders to combat a wide array of anti-Jewish and anti-Israel actions,” although the resolution “is purely symbolic and does not carry policy implications.”[145]

Latin America

Venezuela

In a 2009 news story, Michael Rowan and Douglas E. Schoen wrote, “In an infamous Christmas Eve speech several years ago, Chávez said the Jews killed Christ and have been gobbling up wealth and causing poverty and injustice worldwide ever since.”[146] Hugo Chávez stated that “[t]he world is for all of us, then, but it so happens that a minority, the descendants of the same ones that crucified Christ, the descendants of the same ones that kicked Bolívar out of here and also crucified him in their own way over there in Santa Marta, in Colombia. A minority has taken possession of all of the wealth of the world.”[147]

In February 2012, opposition candidate for the 2012 Venezuelan presidential election Henrique Capriles was subject to what foreign journalists characterized as vicious[148] attacks by state-run media sources.[149][150] The Wall Street Journal said that Capriles “was vilified in a campaign in Venezuela’s state-run media, which insinuated he was, among other things, a homosexual and a Zionist agent”.[148] A 13 February 2012 opinion article in the state-owned Radio Nacional de Venezuela, titled “The Enemy is Zionism”[151] attacked Capriles’ Jewish ancestry and linked him with Jewish national groups because of a meeting he had held with local Jewish leaders,[148][149][152] saying, “This is our enemy, the Zionism that Capriles today represents … Zionism, along with capitalism, are responsible for 90% of world poverty and imperialist wars.”[148]

Europe

According to a 2004 report from the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, antisemitism had increased significantly in Europe since 2000, with significant increases in verbal attacks against Jews and vandalism such as graffiti, fire bombings of Jewish schools, desecration of synagogues and cemeteries. Germany, France, Britain, and Russia are the countries with the highest rate of antisemitic incidents in Europe.[153] The Netherlands and Sweden have also consistently had high rates of antisemitic attacks since 2000.[154]

Some claim that recent European antisemitic violence can actually be seen as a spillover from the long running Arab-Israeli conflict since the majority of the perpetrators are from the large Muslim immigrant communities in European cities. However, compared to France, the United Kingdom and much of the rest of Europe, in Germany Arab and pro-Palestinian groups are involved in only a small percentage of antisemitic incidents.[153][155] According to The Stephen Roth Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism, most of the more extreme attacks on Jewish sites and physical attacks on Jews in Europe come from militant Islamic and Muslim groups, and most Jews tend to be assaulted in countries where groups of young Muslim immigrants reside.[156]

On 1 January 2006, Britain’s chief rabbi, Lord Jonathan Sacks, warned that what he called a “tsunami of antisemitism” was spreading globally. In an interview with BBC Radio 4, Sacks said: “A number of my rabbinical colleagues throughout Europe have been assaulted and attacked on the streets. We’ve had synagogues desecrated. We’ve had Jewish schools burnt to the ground – not here but in France. People are attempting to silence and even ban Jewish societies on campuses on the grounds that Jews must support the state of Israel, therefore they should be banned, which is quite extraordinary because … British Jews see themselves as British citizens. So it’s that kind of feeling that you don’t know what’s going to happen next that’s making … some European Jewish communities uncomfortable.”[157]

Following an escalation in antisemitism in 2012, which included the deadly shooting of three children at a Jewish school in France, the European Jewish Congress demanded in July a more proactive response. EJC President Moshe Kantor explained, “We call on authorities to take a more proactive approach so there would be no reason for statements of regret and denunciation. All these smaller attacks remind me of smaller tremors before a massive earthquake. The Jewish community cannot afford to be subject to an earthquake and the authorities cannot say that the writing was not on the wall.” He added that European countries should take legislative efforts to ban any form of incitement, as well as to equip the authorities with the necessary tools to confront any attempt to expand terrorist and violent activities against Jewish communities in Europe.[158]

Germany

The Interior Minister of Germany, Wolfgang Schäuble, points out the official policy of Germany: “We will not tolerate any form of extremism, xenophobia or anti-Semitism.”[159] Although the number of extreme right-wing groups and organisations grew from 141 (2001)[160] to 182 (2006),[161] especially in the formerly communist East Germany,[159] Germany’s measures against right-wing groups and antisemitism are effective, despite Germany having the highest rates of antisemitic acts in Europe. According to the annual reports of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution the overall number of far-right extremists in Germany dropped during the last years from 49,700 (2001),[160] 45,000 (2002),[160] 41,500 (2003),[160] 40,700 (2004),[161] 39,000 (2005),[161] to 38,600 in 2006.[161] Germany provided several million Euros to fund “nationwide programs aimed at fighting far-right extremism, including teams of traveling consultants, and victims’ groups.”[162]

In July 2012, two women were assaulted in Germany, sprayed with tear gas, and were shown a “Hitler salute,” apparently because of a Star of David necklace that they wore.[163]

In late August 2012, Berlin police investigated an attack on a 53-year-old rabbi and his 6-year-old daughter, allegedly by four Arab teens, after which the rabbi needed treatment for head wounds at a hospital. The police classified the attack as a hate crime. Jüdische Allgemeine reported that the rabbi was wearing a kippah and was approached by one of the teens, who asked the rabbi if he was Jewish. The teen then attacked the rabbi while yelling antisemitic comments, and threatened to kill the rabbi’s daughter. Berlin’s mayor condemned the attack, saying that “Berlin is an international city in which intolerance, xenophobia and anti-Semitism are not being tolerated. Police will undertake all efforts to find and arrest the perpetrators.”[164]

In October 2012, various historians, including Dr. Julius H. Schoeps, a prominent German-Jewish historian and a member of the German Interior Ministry’s commission to combat antisemitism, charged the majority of Bundestag deputies with failing to understand antisemitism and the imperativeness of periodic legislative reports on German antisemitism. Schoeps cited various anti-Semitic statements by German parliament members as well. The report in question determined that 15% of Germans are anti-Semitic while over 20% espouse “latent anti-Semitism,” but the report has been criticized for downplaying the sharpness of antisemitism in Germany, as well as for failing to examine anti-Israel media coverage in Germany.[165]

The Netherlands

Antisemitic incidents, from verbal abuse to violence, are reported, allegedly connected with Islamic youth, mostly boys of Moroccan descent. According to the Centre for Information and Documentation on Israel, a pro-Israel lobby group in the Netherlands, in 2009, the number of antisemitic incidents in Amsterdam, the city that is home to most of the approximately 40,000 Dutch Jews, was said to be doubled compared to 2008.[166] In 2010, Raphaël Evers, an orthodox rabbi in Amsterdam, told the Norwegian newspaper aftenposten that Jews can no longer be safe in the city anymore due to the risk of violent assaults. “Jews no longer feel at home in the city. Many are considering aliyah to Israel.”[167] In 2011, the “Anne Frank Foundation reported severe anti-Semitic acts have increased [in the Netherlands] by more than 50 percent.”[168]

United Kingdom

In 2005, a group of British Members of Parliament set up an inquiry into antisemitism, which published its findings in 2006. Its report stated that “until recently, the prevailing opinion both within the Jewish community and beyond [had been] that antisemitism had receded to the point that it existed only on the margins of society.” It found a reversal of this progress since 2000. In his oral evidence, the Chief Rabbi stated: “If you were to ask me is Britain an antisemitic society, the answer is manifestly and obviously no. It is one of the least antisemitic societies in the world.” The inquiry set out to investigate the problem, identify the sources of contemporary antisemitism and make recommendations to improve the situation. It discussed the influence of the Israel-Palestine conflict and issues of anti-Israel sentiment versus antisemitism at length and noted “most of those who gave evidence were at pains to explain that criticism of Israel is not to be regarded in itself as antisemitic … The Israeli government itself may, at times, have mistakenly perceived criticism of its policies and actions to be motivated by antisemitism.”[169] In November 2010, the BBC‘s investigative program Panorama reported that Saudi national textbooks advocating antisemitism were being used in Islamic religious programs attended by 5,000 British schoolchildren in the United Kingdom. In the textbooks, Jews were described as looking like monkeys and pigs.[170]

A report released in 2012 by the Community Security Trust, documenting antisemitic incidents from January–June 2012, revealed that the number of incidents rose in these months compared to incidents in 2011, with 299 cases deemed antisemitic. There was a significant rise in the number of antisemitic incidents in March 2012, apparently influenced by the antisemitic terrorist attack in Toulouse, France during that month by Mohammed Merah.[171][172]

France

France is home to the continent’s largest Jewish community (about 600,000). Jewish leaders decry an intensifying antisemitism in France,[173] mainly among Muslims of Arab or African heritage, but also growing among Caribbean islanders from former French colonies.[174] Former Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy denounced the killing of Ilan Halimi on 13 February 2006 as an antisemitic crime.

Jewish philanthropist Baron Eric de Rothschild suggests that the extent of antisemitism in France has been exaggerated. In an interview with The Jerusalem Post he says that “the one thing you can’t say is that France is an anti-Semitic country.”[175]

In March 2012, Mohammed Merah opened fire at a Jewish school in Toulouse, killing a teacher and three children. A 8 year old girl was shot in the head at point blank range. President Nicolas Sarkozy said that it was “obvious” it was an antisemitic attack[176] and that, “I want to say to all the leaders of the Jewish community, how close we feel to them. All of France is by their side.” The Israeli Prime Minister condemned the “despicable anti-Semitic” murders.[177][178] After a 32 hour siege and standoff with the police outside his house, and a French raid, Merah jumped off a balcony and was shot in the head and killed.[179] Merah told police during the standoff that he intended to keep on attacking, and he loved death the way the police loved life. He also claimed connections with al-Qaeda.[180][181][182]

4 months later, in July 2012, a French Jewish teenager wearing a “distinctive religious symbol” was the victim of a violent antisemitic attack on a train travelling between Toulouse and Lyon. The teen was first verbally harassed and later beaten up by two assailants. Richard Prasquier from the French Jewish umbrella group, CRIF, called the attack “another development in the worrying trend of anti-Semitism in our country.”[183]

Another incident in July 2012 dealt with the vandalism of the synagogue of Noisy-le-Grand of the Seine-Saint-Denis district in Paris. The synagogue was vandalized three times in a ten-day period. Prayer books and shawls were thrown on the floor, windows were shattered, drawers were ransacked, and walls, tables, clocks, and floors were vandalized. The authorities were alerted of the incidents by the Bureau National de Vigilance Contr L’Antisemtisme (BNVCA), a French antisemitism watchdog group, which called for more measures to be taken to prevent future hate crimes. BNVCA President Sammy Ghozlan stated that, “Despite the measures taken, things persist, and I think that we need additional legislation, because the Jewish community is annoyed.”[184]

In August 2012, Abraham Cooper, the dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, met French Interior Minister Manuel Valls and reported that antisemitic attacks against French Jews increased by 40% since Merah’s shooting spree in Toulouse. Cooper pressed Valls to take extra measures to secure the safety of French Jews, as well as to discuss strategies to foil an increasing trend of lone-wolf terrorists on the Internet.[185]

Norway

In 2010, the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation after one year of research, revealed that antisemitism was common among some 8th, 9th, and 10th graders in Oslo’s schools. Teachers at schools with large numbers of Muslims revealed that Muslim students often “praise or admire Adolf Hitler for his killing of Jews“, that “Jew-hate is legitimate within vast groups of Muslim students” and that “Muslims laugh or command [teachers] to stop when trying to educate about the Holocaust“. Additionally, “while some students might protest when some express support for terrorism, none object when students express hate of Jews”, saying that it says in “the Quran that you shall kill Jews, all true Muslims hate Jews”. Most of these students were said to be born and raised in Norway. One Jewish father also stated that his child had been taken by a Muslim mob after school (though the child managed to escape), reportedly “to be taken out to the forest and hung because he was a Jew”.[186][187]

Norwegian Education Minister Kristin Halvorsen referred to the antisemitism reported in this study as being “completely unacceptable.” The head of a local Islamic council joined Jewish leaders and Halvorsen in denouncing such antisemitism.[188]

In October 2012, the Organization for Security and Co-Operation in Europe issued a report regarding antisemitism in Norway, criticizing Norway for an increase in antisemitism in the country and blaming Norwegian officials for failing to address antisemitism.”[189]

Sweden

After Germany and Austria, Sweden has the highest rate of antisemitic incidents in Europe, though the Netherlands has reported a higher rate of antisemitism in some years.[154] A government study in 2006 estimated that 15% of Swedes agree with the statement: “The Jews have too much influence in the world today”.[190] 5% of the entire adult population, and 39% of the Muslim population, harbor strong and consistent antisemitic views. Former Prime Minister Göran Persson described these results as “surprising and terrifying”. However, the Rabbi of Stockholm’s Orthodox Jewish community, Meir Horden claimed that “It’s not true to say that the Swedes are anti-Semitic. Some of them are hostile to Israel because they support the weak side, which they perceive the Palestinians to be.”[191]

In 2009, a synagoguage that served the Jewish community in Malmö was set ablaze. Jewish cemeteries were repeatedly desecrated, worshippers were abused while returning home from prayer, and masked men mockingly chanted “Hitler” in the streets. As a result of security concerns, Malmö’s synagogue has guards and rocket-proof glass in the windows, and the Jewish kindergarten can only be reached through thick steel security doors.[192]

In early 2010, the Swedish publication The Local published series of articles about the growing antisemitism in Malmö, Sweden. In an interview in January 2010, Fredrik Sieradzki of the Jewish Community of Malmö stated that “Threats against Jews have increased steadily in Malmö in recent years and many young Jewish families are choosing to leave the city. Many feel that the community and local politicians have shown a lack of understanding for how the city’s Jewish residents have been marginalized.” He also added that “right now many Jews in Malmö are really concerned about the situation here and don’t believe they have a future here.” The Local also reported that Jewish cemeteries and synagogues have repeatedly been defaced with antisemitic graffiti, and a chapel at another Jewish burial site in Malmö was firebombed in 2009.[193] In 2009 the Malmö police received reports of 79 antisemitic incidents, which was twice the number of the previous year (2008).[194] Fredrik Sieradzki, spokesman for the Malmö Jewish community, estimated that the already small Jewish population is shrinking by 5% a year. “Malmö is a place to move away from,” he said, citing antisemitism as the primary reason.[195]

In March 2010, Fredrik Sieradzk told Die Presse, an Austrian Internet publication, that Jews are being “harassed and physically attacked” by “people from the Middle East,” although he added that only a small number of Malmö’s 40,000 Muslims “exhibit hatred of Jews.” Sieradzk also stated that approximately 30 Jewish families have emigrated from Malmö to Israel in the past year, specifically to escape from harassment. Also in March, the Swedish newspaper Skånska Dagbladet reported that attacks on Jews in Malmö totaled 79 in 2009, about twice as many as the previous year, according to police statistics.[196]

In October 2010, The Forward reported on the current state of Jews and the level of antisemitism in Sweden. Henrik Bachner, a writer and professor of history at the University of Lund, claimed that members of the Swedish Parliament have attended anti-Israel rallies where the Israeli flag was burned while the flags of Hamas and Hezbollah were waved, and the rhetoric was often antisemitic—not just anti-Israel. But such public rhetoric is not branded hateful and denounced. Charles Small, director of the Yale Initiative for the Interdisciplinary Study of Antisemitism, stated that “Sweden is a microcosm of contemporary anti-Semitism. It’s a form of acquiescence to radical Islam, which is diametrically opposed to everything Sweden stands for.” Per Gudmundson, chief editorial writer for Svenska Dagbladet, has sharply criticized politicians who offer “weak excuses” for Muslims accused of anti-Semitic crimes. “Politicians say these kids are poor and oppressed, and we have made them hate. They are, in effect, saying the behavior of these kids is in some way our fault.”[197] Judith Popinski, an 86-year-old Holocaust survivor, stated that she is no longer invited to schools that have a large Muslim presence to tell her story of surviving the Holocaust. Popinski, who found refuge in Malmö in 1945, stated that, until recently, she told her story in Malmö schools as part of their Holocaust studies program, but that now, many schools no longer ask Holocaust survivors to tell their stories, because Muslim students treat them with such disrespect, either ignoring the speakers or walking out of the class. She further stated that “Malmö reminds me of the anti-Semitism I felt as a child in Poland before the war. I am not safe as a Jew in Sweden anymore.”[195]

In December 2010, the Jewish human rights organization Simon Wiesenthal Center issued a travel advisory concerning Sweden, advising Jews to express “extreme caution” when visiting the southern parts of the country due to an alleged increase in verbal and physical harassment of Jewish citizens in the city of Malmö.[198]

Ilmar Reepalu, the mayor of Malmö for over 15 years, has been accused of failing to protect the Jewish community in Malmö, causing 30 Jewish families to leave the city in 2010, and more preparing to leave, which has left the possibility that Malmö’s Jewish community will disappear soon. Critics of Reepalu say that his statements, such as antisemitism in Malmö actually being an “understandable” consequence of Israeli policy in the Middle East, have encouraged young Muslims to abuse and harass the Jewish community.[192] In an interview with the Sunday Telegraph in February 2010, Reepalu said, “There haven’t been any attacks on Jewish people, and if Jews from the city want to move to Israel that is not a matter for Malmö,” which renewed concerns about Reepalu.[199]

Middle East

Robert Bernstein, founder of Human Rights Watch, says that antisemitism is “deeply ingrained and institutionalized” in “Arab nations in modern times.”[200]

In a 2011 survey by the Pew Research Center, all of the Muslim-majority Middle Eastern countries polled held strongly negative views of Jews. In the questionnaire, only 2% of Egyptians, 3% of Lebanese Muslims, and 2% of Jordanians reported having a positive view of Jews. Muslim-majority countries outside the Middle East held similarly negative views, with 4% of Turks and 9% of Indonesians viewing Jews favorably.[201]

Edward Rothstein, cultural critic of The New York Times, writes that some of the dialogue from Middle East media and commentators about Jews bear a striking resemblance to Nazi propaganda.[202] According to Josef Joffe of Newsweek, “anti-Semitism—the real stuff, not just bad-mouthing particular Israeli policies—is as much part of Arab life today as the hijab or the hookah. Whereas this darkest of creeds is no longer tolerated in polite society in the West, in the Arab world, Jew hatred remains culturally endemic.”[203]

In the Middle East, anti-Zionist propaganda frequently adopts the terminology and symbols of the Holocaust to demonize Israel and its leaders.

Muslim clerics in the Middle East have frequently referred to Jews as descendants of apes and pigs, which are conventional epithets for Jews and Christians.[204][205][206]

According to professor Robert Wistrich, director of the Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism (SICSA), the calls for the destruction of Israel by Iran or by Hamas, Hezbollah, Islamic Jihad, or the Muslim Brotherhood, represent a contemporary mode of genocidal anti-Semitism.[207]

Egypt

In Egypt, Dar al-Fadhilah published a translation of Henry Ford‘s antisemitic treatise, The International Jew, complete with distinctly antisemitic imagery on the cover.[208]

On 5 May 2001, after Shimon Peres visited Egypt, the Egyptian al-Akhbar internet paper said that “lies and deceit are not foreign to Jews[...]. For this reason, Allah changed their shape and made them into monkeys and pigs.”[209]

In July 2012, Egypt’s Al Nahar channel fooled actors into thinking they were on an Israeli television show and filmed their reactions to being told it was an Israeli television show. In response, some of the actors launched into antisemitic rants or dialogue, and many became violent. Actress Mayer El Beblawi said that “Allah did not curse the worm and moth as much as he cursed the Jews” while actor Mahmoud Abdel Ghaffar launched into a violent rage and said, “You brought me someone who looks like a Jew… I hate the Jews to death” after finding out it was a prank.[210][211]

Palestinian Territories

Mudar Zahran, a Palestinian, writing for the Hudson Institute says that “the Palestinians have been used as fuel for the new form of anti-Semitism; this has hurt the Palestinians and exposed them to unprecedented and purposely media-ignored abuse by Arab governments, including some of those who claim love for the Palestinians, yet in fact only bear hatred to Jews. This has resulted in Palestinian cries for justice, equality, freedom and even basic human rights being ignored while the world getting consumed with delegitimizing Israel from either ignorance or malice.”[212]

In March 2011, the Israeli government issued a paper claiming that “Anti-Israel and anti-Semitic messages are heard regularly in the government and private media and in the mosques and are taught in school books,” to the extent that they are “an integral part of the fabric of life inside the PA.”[213] In August 2012, Israeli Strategic Affairs Ministry director-general Yossi Kuperwasser stated that Palestinian incitement to antisemitism is “going on all the time” and that it is “worrying and disturbing.” At an institutional level, he said the PA has been promoting three key messages to the Palestinian people that constitute incitement: “that the Palestinians would eventually be the sole sovereign on all the land from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea; that Jews, especially those who live in Israel, were not really human beings but rather ‘the scum of mankind'; and that all tools were legitimate in the struggle against Israel and the Jews.”[214]

Haj Amin al-Husseini meeting with Adolf Hitler, December 1941. The Grand Mufti of Jerusalem helped recruit Muslims for the Waffen-SS.

Iran [edit]

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran has frequently denied the Holocaust.

In July, the winner of Iran’s first annual International Wall Street Downfall Cartoon Festival, jointly sponsored by the semi-state-run Iranian media outlet Fars News, was an antisemitic cartoon depicting Jews praying before the New York Stock Exchange, which is made to look like the Western Wall. Other cartoons in the contest were antisemitic as well. The national director of the Anti-Defamation League, Abraham Foxman, condemned the cartoon, stating that “Here’s the anti-Semitic notion of Jews and their love for money, the canard that Jews ‘control’ Wall Street, and a cynical perversion of the Western Wall, the holiest site in Judaism,” and “Once again Iran takes the prize for promoting antisemitism.”[215][216][217]

Lebanon

In 2004, Al-Manar, a media network affiliated with Hezbollah, aired a drama series, The Diaspora, which observers allege is based on historical antisemitic allegations. BBC correspondents who have watched the program says it quotes extensively from the Protocols of the Elders of Zion.[218]

Saudi Arabia

The website of the Saudi Arabian Supreme Commission for Tourism initially stated that Jews would not be granted tourist visas to enter the country.[219][220] The Saudi embassy in the U.S. distanced itself from the statement, which was later removed.[221]

In 2001, Arab Radio and Television of Saudi Arabia produced a 30-part television miniseries entitled “Horseman Without a Horse”, a dramatization of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.[222] One Saudi Arabian government newspaper suggested that hatred of all Jews is justifiable.[223]

Saudi textbooks vilify Jews (and Christians and non-Wahabi Muslims): according to the 21 May 2006 issue of The Washington Post, Saudi textbooks claimed by them to have been sanitized of antisemitism still call Jews apes (and Christians swine); demand that students avoid and not befriend Jews; claim that Jews worship the devil; and encourage Muslims to engage in Jihad to vanquish Jews.[224]

The Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House analyzed a set of Saudi Ministry of Education textbooks in Islamic studies courses for elementary and secondary school students. The researchers found statements promoting hate of Christians, Jews, “polytheists” and other “unbelievers,” including non-Wahabi Muslims. The Protocols of the Elders of Zion was taught as historical fact. The texts described Jews and Christians as enemies of Muslim believers and the clash between them as an ongoing fight that will end in victory over the Jews. Jews were blamed for virtually all the “subversion” and wars of the modern world.[225] A 38-page overview PDF (371 KB) of Saudi Arabia’s curriculum has been released to the press by the Hudson Institute.

The BBC aired a Panorama episode, entitled A Question of Leadership, which reported that al-Sudais referred to Jews as “the scum of the human race” and “offspring of apes and pigs”, and stated, “the worst [...] of the enemies of Islam are those [...] whom he [...] made monkeys and pigs, the aggressive Jews and oppressive Zionists and those that follow them [...] Monkeys and pigs and worshippers of false Gods who are the Jews and the Zionists.” Abdul Rahman Al-Sudais is the leading imam of the Grand mosque located in the Islamic holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia.[226][227] In another sermon, on 19 April 2002, he declared that Jews are “evil offspring, infidels, distorters of [others'] words, calf-worshippers, prophet-murderers, prophecy-deniers [...] the scum of the human race whom Allah cursed and turned into apes and pigs [...]“[228]

Asia

Malaysia

Although Malaysia presently has no Jewish population, the country has reportedly become an example of a phenomenon called “Anti-Semitism without Jews.”

In his treatise on Malay identity, “The Malay Dilemma,” which was published in 1970, former Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad wrote: “The Jews are not only hooked-nosed … but understand money instinctively. … Jewish stinginess and financial wizardry gained them the economic control of Europe and provoked antisemitism which waxed and waned throughout Europe through the ages.”[229]

The Malay-language Utusan Malaysia daily stated in an editorial that Malaysians “cannot allow anyone, especially the Jews, to interfere secretly in this country’s business… When the drums are pounded hard in the name of human rights, the pro-Jewish people will have their best opportunity to interfere in any Islamic country,” the newspaper said. “We might not realize that the enthusiasm to support actions such as demonstrations will cause us to help foreign groups succeed in their mission of controlling this country.” Prime Minister Najib Razak‘s office susbsequently issued a statement late Monday saying Utusan’s claim did “not reflect the views of the government.”[230][231][232]

Turkey

In recent decades, synagogues have been targeted in a number of terrorist attacks. In 2003, the Neve Shalom Synagogue was targeted in a car bombing, killing 21 Turkish Muslims and 6 Jews.[233]

In June 2011, the Economist suggested that “The best way for Turks to promote democracy would be to vote against the ruling party”. Not long after, the Turkish Prime Minister, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, said that “The International media, as they are supported by Israel, would not be happy with the continuation of the AKP government”.[234] The Hurriyet Daily News quoted Erdoğan at the time as claiming “The Economist is part of an Israeli conspiracy that aims to topple the Turkish government”.[235] Moreover, during Erdogan’s tenure, Hitler’s Mein Kampf has once again become a best selling book in Turkey.[234] Prime Minister Erdogan called antisemitism a “crime against humanity.” He also said that “as a minority, they’re our citizens. Both their security and the right to observe their faith are under our guarantee

About mrkowalzki21

Netbanging deliver the TRUTH!!!
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